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Antiracist Pedagogy Resources

This guide aims to help instructors find and integrate antiracist materials into their courses and to explore antiracist frames of pedagogy.

What is this?

This library guide is an ongoing collaboration with the Anti-racism Pedagogy and Curriculum Development Task Force. It aims to provide Winona State University instructors with information that helps them integrate anti-racist theory into their courses. When it comes to developing an anti-racist curriculum and holding oneself accountable as an anti-racist instructor, it can be difficult to know where to start. 

This guide's focus is not to guide patrons through the process of self-reflection that comes with critical, anti-racist action. That is a significant but parallel endeavor to actively developing and integrating materials into your courses. If you are just starting to explore what it means to be anti-racist, interrogate social inequities, and analyze the impact of race and racism in your discipline, you will want to start by reviewing resources through the WSU Equity and Inclusive Excellence Center. One such resource they have shared is this document, which offers links and exercises on personal bias and identity reflection. 

The Krueger Library does not claim expertise on this topic: you are encouraged, as subject specialists, to talk with your liaison librarians about possible additions to this guide. This work is collective, ongoing, and constantly changing. 

That said, the library is committed to helping you search for, acquire, and integrate reputable, authoritative materials into your courses. It is also dedicated to instructing students, staff, and the community on information literacy skills. This includes understanding conversations in academic scholarship and becoming a responsible consumer and producer of information.

How is this resource organized?

On the left you will find a set of tabs that are organized by general college subject area. Hover over each tab to view pages dedicated to individual disciplines and departments. 

If your discipline is not listed, but you would like it to be, reach out to your liaison librarian to discuss possible resources that may be of use to you and your department colleagues. Each department may have different needs regarding kinds of anti-racist techniques, materials, and assistance through the library.